Author : Sloth-Nielsen, J. et al. Year: 2009

At the heart of this report lies a conception of the “measurement” of the child-friendliness of laws and policies, which in development theory and programme implementation frequently involves the development of “indicators” as tools to guide compliance, progress or delivery. For practical and logical reasons, an attempt is made in this report, wherever possible, to build on existing indicators of good practice.

Year: 2006

Violence against children remains a pervasive, yet often ignored, issue throughout the world, especially in Africa. This is certainly the case in Ethiopia, where children are often humiliated, physically beaten, and psychologically abused at home, at school, and in their communities. Due to harmful traditional beliefs that sanction violence as a means of raising and educating children and the silencing of those children who suffer from such abuse, there is little understanding in these societies of how harmful violence against children can be.

Year: 2007

This film provides a living, visual counterpoint to the written surveys and statistical data compiled on the various forms of physical, emotional, and psychological abuse which African children suffer. The final product is a heart-wrenching portrayal of the dire situation of many African children—in their own voices and from their perspective. Particular attention is paid to violence against girls and sexual abuse, much of which is indistinguishable from emotional and psychological abuse. The film is intended for a wide, diverse audience and has been subtitled into four different languages so that the urgent message contained therein may be appreciated by audiences of various national and linguistic backgrounds. 

Year : 2007

The African Child Policy Forum’s Child Protection Programme is predicated on the belief that more needs to be done, both in terms of the letter of the law and its application, in order to protect Africa’s children from violence, poverty and disease. While poverty and under-development are important causes of child-rights violations, social behavior, culture, and tradition are equally relevant. Harmful traditional practices such as female genital mutilation are outlawed in most countries.

Year : 2007

Based on the findings of the ACPF’s study of legal harmonisation in Southern and Eastern Africa In the Best Interests of the Child and the experiences of countries that are party to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child and the African Charter some practical guidelines, observations and suggestions have been offered by noted expert Professor Jaap Doek. The ratification of both is essential: as of now 38 of 53 nations have signed on to the African Charter, while all African states have ratified the CRC. Article 24, paragraph 3 of the CRC requires all states to abolish traditional practices prejudicial to the health of children.

Year: 2007

This report is the first attempt of its kind to examine the implementation of appropriate legislative, administrative and other measures in any region in the world. The study covers nineteen countries in Eastern and Southern Africa, and provides a wealth of information regarding the legislative measures taken by these countries to implement the United Nations Conventions on the Rights of the Child as well as the African Charter.